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PBS
Oct 30, 2012 4:00pm PDT
booming cities are at a standstill. 33 people have reportedly been killed. >> the destructive power of the super storm unleashed after dark as sandy made landfall. the flooding was instant, the scale shocking. the storm arrived with high tide in new york harbor, creating a surge of nearly 14 feet. subway tunnels flooded. the water engulfed the construction site at ground zero. manhattan was plunged into darkness. electricity generators and exploded in spectacular fashion. >> what is going on? i don't know what is going on. >> oh, my god. >> many cars were damaged by falling trees and high winds. >> 0, my god. my car. >> patients were evacuated from the hospital that lost power when its generator failed. >> in this huge blaze in queens and started in the aftermath of the flood. more than 80 houses were destroyed by the fire. incredibly, only a few people were injured. on staten island, the force that tossed a vote on shore. >> make no mistake about it, this was a devastating storm, maybe the worst we have ever experienced. our first responders have been doing a heroic job protecting
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 3:00pm PDT
that green bay is one of the most swinging cities in the whole country, politically speaking, that is. we'll explain. >> ifill: the supreme court devoted its day to drug-sniffing dogs and privacy rights. we talk with marcia coyle of the national law journal. >> woodruff: and spencer michels looks at the complaints about apple's maps and the high stakes for those trying to come up with something better. >> the battle over digital map making indicates how crucial this field has become and it could bode well for consumers as the maps get better. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the u.s. death toll from the giant storm named sandy has risen to at least 63 today. about 6.5 million homes and businesses a
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 4:00pm PDT
organization. the people's funeral service helps poor families when they lose a loved one in a city where everyday killing is a fact of life. [indistinct talking] >> another day, another death. a community struggles to understand the killing of a young man, just one of 20 people who meet a violent end every day in honduras. ramon orlando varela was gunned down the day before as he dropped his children off at school. [indistinct talking] he was just 26 years old. [horns honk] ramon's funeral has been funded by the people's funeral service, set up by the mayor of tegucigalpa. nilvia castillo is in charge. [speaking in spanish] >> and it's certainly in demand. in honduras, a toxic mix of guns, gangs, drugs, and corruption has engendered the highest homicide rate in the world--over 80 times that of most european countries. [indistinct talking] the shade is welcome under a tropical sun. but this is no picnic. it's the city's morgue. and all of these people are waiting for the body of a loved one to be released for burial. [speaking in spanish] johnny and his colleagues from the people's funera
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 4:00pm PDT
escape. at the heart of the city, life is slowly returning to normal. new yorkers across the brooklyn bridge on a foot. michael bloomberg sounded a defiant first belt of a reopened stock exchange. the message from the mayor is that the big apple is open for business. that only tells part of the story. in the greater new york area, there is still many many homes without power. the subway network is shut down. this is the scene at one subway station where monday night the waters rose from track to ceiling. parts of the network will reopen tomorrow. this is a city that has survived or stand sandy. hear, all along on the eastern seaboard. questions to test those who would lead america. >> questions indeed. for the very latest, we can go to jane hill. as steve was reported, the city is starting to get back to life. i am not sure this will be a new york that we all know. >> no, it is a very peculiar feeling. we are very near battery park on the southern tip of manhattan. this is the battery under park, one of the seven main passes through the city. four out of seven of these tunnels are sti
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 2:30pm PDT
a stark picture of what 24 hours is like in an inner-city pr -- e.r. we are glad you have joined us. a conversation with peter nicks coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, and we have a lot of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the issue of health care has been a constant conversation in this country over the past few years, amplified during this campaign season. behind the politics of health care is the reality of what many americans face, especially in inner cities. peter nicks decided to chronicle a day in a life of an open emergency room. the film is called "the waiting room" and is being called one of the best documentary projects of the year. it is playing in select cities across the country. here are s
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 7:00pm PDT
unveiled its much anticipated new operating system, windows 8, here in new york city, and showed off its new tablet, the surface. the operating system's key feature-- an ability to work across all computers: tablets, laptops and desktops. over one billion hours of testing time went into the new operating system and the surface tablet. c.e.o. steve ballmer calls them a milestone in computing. >> with windows 8, we've brought together the best of worlds-- the p.c. and the tablet; your work, life, and play. windows 8 will help you do everything, and it will make it a lot of fun, frankly, to do nothing. one device now combines the greatest qualities with the p.c. with the greatest qualities of the tablet experience. >> susie: joining us now with more on tablets, and those apple earnings, david garrity, head of his own tech research firm, gva research. david, you have been a real strong recommender of apple stock. any change in your thinking because of those earnings today and the disappointment? >> susie, no. for a couple simple reasons. first off, apple with their announcement earlier t
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 12:00am PDT
worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: evan thomas is here, an author, a journalist and a professor at princeton. he has written on topics including robert kennedy, barack obama, the ci and wise men in his latest book he turns to president eisenhower, thomas sheds light on aspects of eisenhower's personality that have often been overlooked, he examines how the president's tactical skill informed his leadership and his foreign policy, the book is called ike's bluff, president eisenhower's secret battle to save the world, i am pleased to have evan thomas back at this table. welcome. >> charlie. >> rose: why do you call it ike's bluff? >> well, he was running a big bluff. he was bluffing with nuclear weapons. >> rose: meaning what? >> meaning ike's central insight was that he didn't want to fight any wars, not little wars, not immediate wars, he didn't want to fight any wars but the ways to avoid that was to threaten to have a really big war. at
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 3:00pm PDT
. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war. we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on a strata of centuries of -- >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this pr
PBS
Oct 17, 2012 3:00pm PDT
day the china central bank intervenes in the business. in september, 2010, in new york city, the premier and china's economic czar said china keeps its currency low in order to give a trade advantage to its manufacturerrers. manufacturers. we should brand it as a currency manipulator. >> you heard the president say the currency has depreciated? >> i think it is a serious problem to brand them a currency manipulator. a lot of countries intervene to affect the value of their currency. japan has many times, and so has many others. we haven't branded any of them a currency manipulator ever. secondly, the chinese currency is what the market price would be. you see that reflected in china's current account balance. the bottom line is the current account balance is well within the standards that we, ourselves, have advocated, saying if it is within those standards it really is not a big problem. the obama administration has pressured china from the start on currency values. they are now close to the market rate. but the issue is two-fold: one, currency value is not, by any means, the bi
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 7:00pm PDT
the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corroborates what we've been seeing in the economic reports on the housing market. >> reporter: conditions in the manufacturing sector were mixed, but somewhat improved since the last reading. meanwhile, the job market was little changed since the last report, which was the released in august. that was a bit of a surprise, given the recent drop in the nation's unemployment rate. but, at least one economist says it suggests the lower jobless rate may not be sustainable. >> it doesn't appear that the labor market is really showing all that much fundamental improvement and that's not all that surprising given the uncertainty around the pending fiscal cliff at yearend, the upcoming election. >> reporter: today's new economic evidence is consistent with third quarte
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 4:00pm PDT
foothills sit the mile high city. the beating heart of a critical swing states, a state where women voters outnumber men by more than 100,000. >> my name is rebecca. i am a single mother with three teenage children. >> i am catherine. my husband is working two jobs while i stay home and take care of my 2-year-old daughter, charlotte. >> women on a budget come to this giant retailer for a no- frills convenience. the cards are used to have a corporate job. the right after she was born i was laid off we went from having a lot of money to not nearly as much money. >> bill clinton famous huizar -- famously targets of bombs. sarah palin rallied hockey mom spirit of the 2012 variation on that group could decide the outcome. that is because in elections wal-mart moms intend to make up their minds late. as rebecca cut back on spending, she wants a president who will do the same. >> we have to look at where our budget is. how do we fix it? how do we get it back on the right track? because it is a mess. >> at catherine's house it is breakfast time and there is a helping of negative political a
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 4:00pm PDT
syrian capital of damascus, a reminder that the war is intensifying. it is the northern city of aleppo that has seen some of the fiercest fighting. we have seen the terrible suffering at one of the hospitals in the city where doctors struggle to treat wounded patients. his report contains graphic images. >> this is serious descent into hell. a ruthless air campaign. and the carnage in it wreaks. a war between the state and an armed rebellion where even those that treat the victims are targeted. this hospital has been shelled 12 times. there are few facilities left now to treat the living. and so the bodies pile up outside. waiting to be collected. inside, the surgeon treaty 2- year-old. the scalp was torn open when a rocket landed on his house. in the next bed, the doctors struggled to try to keep them alive. these are now the only two beds left for the surgeons can operate. and with the threat of attack, the entire hospital has moved. every few minutes, more casualties, men. a grim procession of patients from different parts of the city. victims of a remorseless campaign of air
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 4:00pm PDT
for this, syria's largest city. cease-fire or not, neither side wants to give up the advantage. >> the military situation is excellent, this rebel commander told me. the government is bombing civilians, but god is generous to us and we're gaining ground. we won't stop until the whole of aleppo is liberated. the rebels are taking prisoners. he once command add units of the feared paramilitary ghosts. now he's in jail. he tells me that a colonel in syrian intelligence ordered his men to kidnap female activists and subject them to gang rape. >> we raped four girls he tells me matter of factly. students informers told. they were raped on the bus. there's so much bitterness it's hard to see how the two sides can sit down together and move into a political process. that was the slim hope which rested on the u.n. attempt to get a cease-fire. instead blood was spilled across syria today with bomb attacks in the capital, damascus, shelling at homes and fighting in aleppo in the north. >> business as usual, then. the northern town and the government shelling today. every previous attempt
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 9:00pm PDT
, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something you can't talk about because it's politically unacceptable, well, you're not going to be open with the people all around you. >> narrator: now the church was sending mitt away to spend two and half years on a mission in france. >> as mitt romney has said, imagine going to bordeaux and saying to people, "i've got a great new religion for
PBS
Oct 31, 2012 12:00pm PDT
. >> hurricane force winds pounded ocean city maryland and they said all along their biggest worry by far is flooding. >> this is what you get on the flip side of hurricane sandy, snow. >> and it hasn't stopped all night. >> the storm has caused the cancellation of 14,000 flights across the country. >> do we know how this storm may affect vote something. >> this is a frantic time for both campaigns to a pause is something they want to get over with fast. >> hopefully your thoughts and prayers will join with mine, to think about those folks who are in harm's way. a. great thing about america iss like this, we all stick together, the good news is we will clean up and we will get through this. >> we turn now to politics with mark halperin of time magazine, who is also the best selling author of game change. >> if this storm hadn't happened we would be seeing wall-to-wall coverage of one of the most exciting finishes to a presidential election in the television age. we are not going to see as much of that, certainly through the weekend. which means whichever candidate was going to bene
PBS
Oct 9, 2012 1:00am PDT
triple "a", but some cities are experiencing even higher prices. for drivers, the good news is prices are expected to fall, but california remains vulnerable to quick price hikes. refinery and pipeline problems have put the squeeze on supplies and california drivers. >> well its pretty crazy. >> i think it sucks. big time i mean its terrible" >> the went up pretty high from last week." >> they just jump them up real quick and then it takes forever to get them back down again it is pretty ridiculous. >> tom: today's average price in the state, $4.67 a gallon for regular unleaded. that's $0.50 higher than a week ago. $0.86 higher than the national average. wholesale gas prices fell today after california governor jerry brown yesterday eased the state's gas-blend requirements. the change allows refiners to start processing a less- expensive winter fuel blend today, about three weeks ahead of schedule. california's strict air quality standards require a specific gasoline blend that's not necessary in other states, resulting in only a handful of refiners making it. the price spike c
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 7:00pm PDT
, but still ahead, i'll introduce you to two new york city firms that can't hire workers fast enough. >> tom: the federal government made what it called one of the largest medicare fraud crackdowns today, arresting dozens of people across seven cities, accusing them of cheating medicare out of $430 million. today's busts involved 91 people, including doctors, nurses, and hospital administrators, including these arrests in miami. among the scams-- the president of riverside general hospital in houston and his son are accused of giving medicare patients food and cigarettes for claiming to get hospital care, but instead watched tv or played games. federal prosecutors said that scheme led to $158 million in fake bills. today's action, announced by the justice department, stretched from brooklyn to los angeles. >> this is something i think we see at a variety of levels. we see it among people who are health care professionals who take oaths to provide care and do no harm, and in fact they are doing great harm. we are going after people, whatever their positions, whatever their levels, to
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 4:00pm PDT
. it is not all of damascus. it is one little area. not a whole city. >> but this place isn't shut off from the rest of the country. when serious uprising began some -- when syria's uprising began some 18 months ago, there are also uprisings in the square here, but they were forcefully put down. aside from occasional demonstrations or explosions since then, this remains one of the most peaceful areas in the whole country. authorities are determined to keep it that way because this region is too important to lose. it is the ancestral home of the assad's. they are a large minority in this city and they dominate the hills behind. by charlotte saw's father is buried in these hills. we were -- bashar al-assad's father is buried in these hills. we were given rare access. he died in 2000, as syria's all- powerful president. it is often his -- it is often said his son is under pressure to preserve his legacy. this town was quiet when we visited. since then, there have been reported clashes between leading families. a measure of growing unease over their place in syria's troubled future. th
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 4:00pm PDT
athens and other big cities and the darkness of the public mood. >> thank you. the debt crisis in europe and sluggish growth in the u.s. has had a huge impact on china. the country has seen a drop in demand for its exports. new figures show annual growth there has slipped to 7.4%. that is still an enviable rate compared to most of the world. our correspondent looks at china's toxic legacy. >> they call its -- on every street in every alley, they are making -- if you wear a pair, it was probably made a year. created jobs for millions. like all of china, this town was facing problems, slowing demand overseas, rising costs at home. smaller factories line the river banks, doing things cheaply has come to -- come at a cost. the water is tainted, a disgusting cocktail locals say is too politic to use. >> all along the river, abandoned factories. the polluted water from those places release mouse. >> china's next generation are about to take power here. they face two problems. how to keep the economy growing and also tackle rising discontent and the damage that has been done to the environment.
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 7:00pm PDT
. the number of freelancers in this new york city borough has increased 3,000% in the past decade. david himmelstein is a professor of public health at hunter college, and thinks the clinic is a good idea. his concern is whether the union's insurance plan can survive. >> when you set up an insurance plan and say anyone can join, basically you are likely to attract sick older people who can't get insurance elsewhere in the system. and over the long term, that has doomed similar insurance efforts in the past. >> reporter: but the freelancers union hopes its holistic approach to medicine and emphasis on preventive care will help lower healthcare costs. and that's good for insurance company and patient alike. >> this can really give people the kind of care they need, and it can also be much more economical, so we can make freelancers' dollars go further. >> reporter: if the pilot is successful, the freelancers union hopes to expand to other cities around the country. erika miller, nbr, brooklyn. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we meet a woman who says she's earning almost as much money working for
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 12:00pm PDT
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: anders fogh rasmussen is here, he is the secretary general of nato, he was the prime minister of denmark for eight years before assuming his current post in 2009. he is in new york for the u.n. general assembly, nato has significantly redefined its mission since its founding in 1949. it's primarily-- last year it enforce add no-fly zone in libya and the campaign that overthrew moammar qaddafi. i'm pleased to have the secretary general at this table, welcome. tell me how you have defined the role for nato in the current environment, especially in the middle east. >> the core role is still to protect our citizens against any threat to their security we won the cold war. we protected our citizens against soviet communism, aggression. we won the cold war. the soviet broke down but after the end of the cold war we realized that we are faced we merging security challenges, terrorism, this is the reason why we are in afghanistan. that's why we are now building a nato missile defense system to protect our populations against milz at
PBS
Oct 10, 2012 3:00pm PDT
samutsevich was mobbed by the media as she left the moscow city court. she vowed to fight for the release of the other two women, whose sentences of two years in prison were upheld. the case has been widely condemned in the u.s. and europe as part of a crackdown on dissent. toyota recalled more than seven million vehicles around the world today for a bad power- window switch that can fill the car with smoke. the action affects more than a dozen models made from 2005 through 2010. there have been more than 200 incidents reported in the u.s., but no crashes or injuries have resulted. toyota has been trying to recover from a series of recalls of some 14 million vehicles in recent years. car owners who have crashed in the last three years may have gotten counterfeit airbags as replacements, without knowing it. the national highway traffic safety administration warned today there's an extreme safety risk. it said at least 250,000 vehicles may have airbags that inflate only partially or not at all. car owners should check a website safercar.gov for more information. two americans have w
PBS
Oct 28, 2012 4:00pm PDT
-con 5. >> from cities to suburbs, the decline in state funding and the slump in property values has hit hard. since 2007, the purse student spending in california has been cut by more than $1,200, while costs and salaries continue to rise. in schools around the state, like paraside intermediate in san bruno, the budget cuts have affected the classroom. >> anything you know about atomic structure. >> this eighth grade science teacher says increased class size and lack of funds to upgrade her cramped, 1950s era classroom, are effecting her ability to teach. >> i cram 32 students into this small classroom. so, when, i mean, can you imagine doing a lab in here? i have four chairs to one table. with such large class sizes, i am not able to spend as much time with each student. >> california's schools haven't always relied on the state for the bulk of their funding. until the 1970s, districts raised most of their money through property taxes and bonds. rich districts flourished. poor and minority districts struggled. such inequality was ruled illegal by the state supreme court. then, in 1
PBS
Oct 26, 2012 6:00pm PDT
shelling in the central city of homs. a suicide bomb outside a mosque in northern afghanistan killed 41 people today. plumes of smoke rose in front of the mosque as people gathered to celebrate eid. many of the dead were policemen and soldiers. 56 others, including civilians, were wounded. in kabul, afghan president hamid karzai condemned the attack and made this appeal. >> i call on the taliban and other government opposition to stop the destruction of their own country. stop the killing of their people, stop destruction of their mosques, hospitals and schools, and stop working for the aims of foreigners. >> sreenivasan: also today, the taliban claimed responsibility for the killing of two u.s. troops in an insider attack on thursday. a member of the afghan security forces shot the troops and then escaped to join the taliban. the father of a teenage pakistani girl shot by the taliban had encouraging words about his daughter's recovery today. malala yousufzai's family flew from pakistan to britain to be with her at a hospital where she's receiving specialized treatment. we have a report
PBS
Oct 16, 2012 12:00am PDT
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: next month, the chinese government will undergo its most important leadership transition in recent history. the event has raised questions about the country's political future. even osnos is a long time observer of china. in this week's new yorker magazine he writes about how the pail your of the country's railway industry reveals a dark side of chinese growth. it's called "boss rail: the disaster exposed the underside of the boom." i'm pleased to have evan osnos back at this table. welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: tell us about this railway disaster and what it says. >> this was a train crash last summer at turnene o o to b b more than trains. what happened was quite simple on its face. there were two trains going down a track on the southeastern city of when jo and they collided with each other. and we found out it was because there was a broken signal that failed in the thunderstorm and one train didn't know where the other train was. we've learned that
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 3:00pm PDT
, we have more about danville, kentucky and how the tiny city has prepared to host its second vice presidential debate. plus, we kicked off our livestream coverage of tonight's debate a short time ago, and our online team is running a liveblog with sharp, robust analysis all night long. you can find that at newshour.pbs.org. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": the syrian plane forced to land in turkey; how medicare is playing in congressional races; illegal trafficking in elephant tusks; the nobel prize for literature and one of poetry's leading voices. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: some new data on jobs offered signs of encouragement today. the labor department reported first-time claims for unemployment benefits fell to the lowest level in more than four years. that suggests slightly improved hiring. wall street rose on the news at first, then gave up the gains. the dow jones industrial average ended with a loss of 18 points to close at 13,326. the nasdaq dipped two points to close at 3,049. the international monetary fund w
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 12:00am PDT
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. 6-. >> rose: tonight we continue our conversation about the global economy with a panel of distinguished guests from the "economist" magazine. here are some of the factors we will be looking at: the world looked to europe today as talks continued over the euro zone financial crisis. european central bank president defended his bond-buying program in front of the bandenstag this afternoon. >> these actions are fully and foremost in compliance with our mandate of delivering price stability for the whole of the euro area in the medium term. >> rose: as germany demanded tight control over greek budgets some called austerity measures undemocrat. in the united states a debate at the fiscal responsibility is at the heart of the presidential election. >> if somebody game to you, governor, with a plan that said, here, i want to spend seven or eight trillion dollars and we're going to pay for it but we can't tell you until maybe after the election how we're going to do it, you wouldn't have taken such a sketchy deal. >> we've gone
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 7:00pm PDT
deserving of all the city's cultural institutions, and said his grandparents had their first date there. paulson's known for making billions by betting on the collapse of the housing market. >> susie: lovely donation. >> tom: that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 23. good night, susie, and good night, everyone. >> susie: good night, tom. thanks for watching, everyone. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page-- bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 1:00am PDT
preferences among young, potential homebuyers to live closer to the city or in the first ring of suburbs. many of them are looking to stay in apartments living rather than having a home further out where they need a car to get any where. they would have more of a mortgage they would be tied into. >> reporter: on the flip side, public spending on construction has fallen sharply. it's down 3.5% from a year ago, as state and local governments tighten their belts. the construction industry is hoping next year will be better for hiring than this one. many u.s. businesses have put projects on hold, due to political uncertainty, and worries about the fiscal cliff. but the most important factor is the economy: >> you might expect that as the housing recovery gets a little bit of pace over the next year or so, that should translate into stronger hiring going forward. we are not going to return to levels we were at before the recession, the housing sector is not going to be that big again. but the trend should be up. >> reporter: if construction improves, it's good for the economy as a whole. acco
PBS
Oct 25, 2012 4:00pm PDT
it could lead to a broader peace process. caroline hawley has the story. largest city today, the front line has shifted after weeks of stalemate. the rebels say they have made significant advances in aleppo, taking territory they have never held before. but can they keep it? and will these men now put down their guns? tonight, on state-run television, a statement from the military. it says it will observe a truce before the muslim holiday. the man who negotiated a truce the said at the start of the job that was nearly impossible. most rebel groups have seemed to agree to the cease-fire, but they do not fight under a single combined. at least one islamist group said it will not observe the true spirit -- the troops. >> of the world is watching on friday morning. we all understand there is a lack of trust between the parties, and therefore, we all understand that we cannot be sure yet what will transpire. the hope is that the guns will fall silent. for the people of syria. >> it is -- this is syria's border with turkey on the eve of the truce. since the conflict began, no cease-fir
PBS
Oct 24, 2012 12:00am PDT
funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range of issues, including iran, china and the u.s. economy and offered the candidate the last chance to face-off before the election which is now just two weeks ahead. joining me now is a distinguished group of the wealth of knowledge when it comes to foreign policy, from washington's zbigniew brzezinski, national security advisor, under president jimmy carter, david ignatius of the washington post and michael mazarr, professor of national security strategy at the u.s. national war college. with me in new york, general jim jones, former national security advisor for president obama. i am pleased to have each of them here on this program to talk about this important
PBS
Oct 15, 2012 6:00pm PDT
, and other congressional contests to watch; plus, new clashes in the syrian city of aleppo; the record- breaking sky jump; and the legacy of arlen specter. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: two americans won the 2012 nobel prize in economics today for research on market design and matching. it affects everything from placing doctors in the right hospitals to pairing students with the schools they most want. the honorees are alvin roth of harvard university, and currently a visiting professor at stanford university, and lloyd shapley, a professor emeritus at the university of california los angeles. wall street had a strong start to the week on news of rising retail sales and better-than- expected earnings at citigroup. the dow jones industrial average gained 95 points to close at 13,424. the nasdaq rose 20 points to close at 3064. a 14-year-old pakistani girl who was shot by a taliban gunman was flown to england today for medical treatment. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of independent television news. >> reporter: the ambulance
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 6:00pm PDT
. gazans lined the main road to gaza city, as the emir waved at them from his car. he also met with hamas leaders and urged them to reconcile with the rival fatah faction, which rules the west bank. israel maintains a sea blockade of gaza, but qatar has promised to deliver hundreds of million dollars in aid by land route through egypt. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we return to the final presidential debate with a closer look at the arguable statements made by both candidates. margaret warner has our report. >> warner: last night's final presidential debate took on a lo questions. and the answers at times raised further questions. as we did last week, today we reviewed some of what was said and how it matches the record. starting with mitt romney's charge that from the beginning of his term, president obama was apologizing overseas for america's actions. >> the president began what i've called an apology tour by going to various nations in the middle east and criticizing america. i think they look at that and saw weakness. >> nothing govern
PBS
Oct 18, 2012 12:00am PDT
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with politics. last president obama and governor romney locked horns in a town hall-style debate. the president had much to prove. he came out swinging as he attempted to seize momentum back from governor romney. the governor did not hesitate to respond in kind. >> when you came out in 2014, i presume i'm going to be president, i'm going to make sure you get a job. you took detroit bankrupt. you took general motors bankrupt. you took chrysler bankrupt. when you say i wanted to take the auto industry bankrupt, you did. >> governor romney says he has a 5-point plan. he has a one-point plan and that plan is to make sure that folks at the top play by a different set of rules. >> i believe very much in our renewable capabilitie capabilit- ethanol, wind, solar-- it will be an important part of our energy mix. what we don't need is have the president keeping us from taking advantage of oil, coal, and gas. this has not been mr. oil or mr. gas or mr. coal. >> when i hear governor romney say he
PBS
Oct 22, 2012 12:00pm PDT
worldwide captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. j.k. roeling is here, if you do not know who she is, let me tell you, two decades okay she sat on a delayed train when the image of a scrawny, blackaired bespectacled boy without did not know he was a wizard came to her. her vision soon captured the imaginations of readers around the world and it began an unprecedented cultural phenomenon. "time" magazine has credited harry potter series with creating a fictional universe so detailed and believable that an entire generation has pretty much chose tone live there. it is the best selling book series in history, with more than 4 -- 450 million copies sold in 67 languages. eight movies have also been spawned and they have grossed $7.7 billion worldwide. now five years after laying harry pot tore rest, she has written her first book for adults. it is called the casual vacancy. i'm pleased to have j.k. rowling at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: we have been waiting for you. >> really, go
PBS
Oct 13, 2012 12:00am PDT
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: at the clinton global initiative business and government and ngos were in attendance to talk about big ideas, big problems. >> and here at cgi you've made impressive commitments in this fight. we are especially honored to be joined by advocates who dedicate their lives and at times risk their lives to liberate victims and help them recover. >> rose: we begin with the recent conversation with the president of mexico, felipe calderon. you headed up the g20. what was that experience for you as an opportunity to engage others and focusing on big global problems? >> let me start by remembering the meeting we had in france in november 2011. it was a very disappointing one. we finished that without agreements, even without a sense of direction. so the problem seemed not only serious but also out of control. and then we started a process when mexico took over the head of the g20. we started a multiple processes in the sense that we beginning several ministerial meetings in order to put in a commonplace the different position
PBS
Oct 11, 2012 12:00am PDT
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert kaplan is here, he is chief geopolitical analyst and has been writing about foreign affairs for 25 years. in his latest book he says to better understand global issues we must look to a map. he examines how geography has influenced the balance of world power and how it can inform foreign policy in the future. it is called "the revenge of geography." i'm pleased to have him back on this program. welcome. >> rose: >> a pleasure to be here, charlie. >> rose: henry kissinger said-- and you put this at the top-- that "robert kaplan's research shines light on an ancient truth. geography has been the predominant factor in determinesing the fate of nations, from fay roenic egypt to the arab spring." how long have you been thinking about tht? >> my whole career as a foreign correspondent that stretches back to the early part of the last phase of the cold war. and in every place i went it was physical features that changed things. i would go from -- every time i crossed the afghan/pakistan border i did so ill
PBS
Oct 22, 2012 3:00pm PDT
president biden at the republican friendly retirement community sun city say they are confident that the president will do well in the final debate which will center on foreign affairs. >> i think he and hillary clinton have done a fine job. i mean, after all, romney insulted israel, poland and u.k. all in one week or something. >> i don't think he's really in a position to jump all the way out there as far as foreign affairs is concerned and draw conclusions that we are weaker because of president obama. i think that we are stronger because of president obama. >> woodruff: but democratic state legislator darren soto who knows florida politics says the pressure will be on the president not only to prevail on foreign policy but to make a larger point about the economy. and to do it in a way that gets democrats out of their homes and into the voting booth. >> continuing to fight for us like he did in the second debate will be critical. so he's got to keep that moxie together. second, i think he needs to continue to articulate and even further detail economic plans going forward. that's
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 12:00pm PDT
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. it's time to do nation building right here at home. >> that future is out there, it is waiting for us. >> tonight the special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: welcome to our program. we're live this evening from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for t
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: riccardo muti is here, he is one of the world's great conductors and led some of the best orchestras, including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director o director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazed and charmed which the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi requiem. ♪ .. ♪ ♪ >> rose: muti and the chicago symphony orchestra in new york, to open the season at carnegie hall on october 3rd, they are performing orff's carmina burana, i am happy to have mastery i are back at this table, when you are conducting what are you thinking about? what is going through your head are you hearing the music instantaneously in your head that you know the score or what? >> this is a difficult, it is difficult to answer this question. in any case the conductor starts the performance one frac shun of a second before and ends one se
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 3:00pm PDT
newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at rising temperatures in urban areas, and one city's efforts to cool down. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored so
PBS
Oct 8, 2012 6:00pm PDT
city's efforts to cool down. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online, and again here tomorrow evening. thank you, and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
PBS
Oct 30, 2012 10:00pm PDT
, or the county or the city, they would be there to replace you. >> ryssdal: i want to make sure i understand this. this is a 501c4 social welfare group. >> correct. >> ryssdal: with specific candidates that it wanted to target and recruiting specific candidates to promote its agenda. >> correct. >> ryssdal: she showed me how they did it. i want to flip to the last page. wtp had a plan-- a plan to raise and spend more than half a million dollars on montana state races. to make that happen, they had a secret fundraising script for loendorf and others to use on prospective donors. that script went like this. >> "we're a 501c4 organization. >> ryssdal: and... >> "corporate contributions are completely legal under this program." >> ryssdal: and... >> "there is no limit to how much you can give." >> ryssdal: and, most important... >> "it's confidential. we're not required to report the name or the amount of any contribution that we receive." >> ryssdal: so if you decide to support the program... >> "no politician, nor bureaucrat or nor radical environmentalist will ever know you helpeda
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 3:00pm PDT
investigation focused on alleged fraud in seven cities. sensitive u.s. documents still aren't fully secured at the burned-out american consulate in benghazi, libya, three weeks after it was attacked. the "washington post" reported today the papers detailed weapons collection operations, personnel records, and the schedule for u.s. ambassador christopher stevens, who died in the attack. in washington today, state department spokeswoman victoria nuland acknowledged only two private guards are protecting the site. >> we have had some challenges securing the site. we are continuing to talk to the libyan side about that. but this was not-- based on what we've seen-- any kind of breach of classified information. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, the f.b.i. confirmed a team of agents visited benghazi yesterday, for the first time. until now, the group had stayed away, due to security concerns. a long-standing battle over google's book-scanning project was settled today. authors and publishers filed suit against the company back in 2005, saying it violated their copyrights. google launched the pro
PBS
Oct 12, 2012 3:00pm PDT
: so how much silk does spider-man need to swing through new york city? we talked to one physics professor who is trying to bring science fiction a little closer to science fact. plus, will the new health care law cover non-citizens? yes, if they're here legally. find that story from our partners at kaiser health news on the rundown. and on tonight's edition of "need to know," ray moderates a roundtable discussion about the fiscal cliff and congress's deadline to deal with expiring tax cuts and automatic spending cuts. find a link to "need to know" and much more at newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll talk with npr's peter overby about spending by super-pacs on campaign ads. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
PBS
Oct 17, 2012 12:00am PDT
from new york city, hofstra university in washington, d.c. president obama and governor romney clashed in the second of three debates before election kay on november 6th, intense pressure on both candidates but especially the president. his poor showing in the first debate shifted the momentum of the race. the a gallup poll earlier today put governor romney ahead 50 to 46 nationally, the campaigns have been focusing closely on a select few battleground states, including florida, ohio and virginia, tonight the candidates engage in a stir irs of heated exchanges on stage, joining me in new york, jon meacham, the author of the forthcoming book thomas jefferson, and mark halperin of time magazine and john heilemann of time magazine. >> albert hunt, executive editor of bloberg news and david leonhardt the bureau chief of "the new york times", joining us shortly from washington, katty kay of bbc world news of america, and slate magazine, we have a really fascinating group of people here to talk about what was a remarkable debate. i begin first with al hunt. >> charlie, if the barack
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